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Quartz worktops continue to grow in popularity for kitchens, and the quartz manufacturers are constantly looking ahead in order to keep up with current trends and create new colours and styles.  As quartz production technology advances, some effects and looks have become possible that eluded the manufacturers of “first generation” engineered stone. In our opinion, a real recent advance in the available material for quartz worktops is the recreation with a high level of fidelity of the classic marble worktop.

In the days before the tooling was available to work a material as hard and durable as granite, marble worktops used to be popular for kitchens because of their natural beauty and the coolness that natural stone provides. This applied especially in the days before refrigeration, and many pastry cooks still value marble for exactly this reason. But now that granite worktops are readily available, no one would recommend natural marble for kitchens because it is not nearly as durable as granite and quartz: as a metamorphic rock it scratches easily and is also readily attacked by acids.

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The early quartzes that were created to look like marbles were a little disappointing, as the “marbling effect” tended to be in an overly distinct pattern which could look fine in a small sample but in any larger slab or worktop looked repetitive and artificial. However, new technology and methods now available in the engineered stone manufacturing plants have produced great leaps forward. We have been really impressed with some of the new “marble” coloured quartzes.

As tends to be the case with all things new, especially where technological innovation is involved, these marble-effect quartzes are at the very top of the price range. Yet customers looking for quartz worktops and willing to make the outlay are offered all the durability of a state-of-the-art engineered stone, with the beauty and lustre you would expect from traditional marble.

The Nebula Silestone series by Cosentino contains a range of marble-effect quartzes in a monochrome colour palette. The Lagoon and the Lyra (see above) in palest grey-white look like the very best marble and the dark grey Merope would be a much more durable alternative to slate or honed (not polished ) granite. The whole range though seems to have captured a very realistic natural look.

Black Ama

The Nature range from Compac is also very impressive. Starting with the lightest shade of Carrara through to the black Portoro and Black Ama (see left).

The well-named Nature range takes in a slightly warmer palette than the Nebula Silestone with the beautiful creamy Perlino and Botticino, which would both go well with warm wood-colour doors, through the beigey tones of Noce to the delicious chocolate brown of Imperial.

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As tends to be the case with all things new, especially where technological innovation is involved, these marble-effect quartzes are at the very top of the price range. Yet customers looking for quartz worktops and willing to make the outlay are offered all the durability of a state-of-the-art engineered stone, with the beauty and lustre you would expect from traditional marble.

If you would like samples of any of our quartz please contact our office on 01293 863992 or contact us online